"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)

"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)
"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)
September 19 is the last post for this blog. Thanks to all my readers!

Friday, November 1, 2013

1 November 2013

 Birthdays
Natalia Tena b. 1984 (Harry Potter, Game of Thrones)
Logan Marshall-Green b. 1976 (Prometheus)
Toni Collette b. 1972 (The Sixth Sense)
Susanna Clarke b. 1959 (won the 2005 Hugo for Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell)
Rachel Ticotin b.1958 (Total Recall)
Peter Ostrum b. 1957 (Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory)
Dennis Muren b. 1946 (special effects, Star Wars, Battlestar Galactica, E.T., Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Terminator 2, Ghostbusters 2, Jurassic Park, War of the Worlds, Super 8)
Robert Foxworth b. 1941 (Babylon 5, Star Trek, Stargate, Transformers)
Jo Morrow b. 1939 (Three Worlds of Gulliver)
Barbara Bosson b. 1939 (The Last Starfighter, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Lois & Clark, Capricorn One)
Gordon Dickson b. 1923 died 31 January 2001 (author, Dragon Knight, Hoka series)
Malcolm Smith b. 1910 died 11 June 1966 (artist)
Edward Van Sloan b. 1882 died 6 March 1964 (Frankenstein, Dracula, The Mummy)

A little biographical info on some of our names. Natalia Tena is Osha in Game of Thrones and Nymphadora Tonks in Harry Potter. Peter Ostrum had only one role in his career as Charlie in Willy Wonka. Dennis Muren is a Really Big Deal in special effects. Edward Van Sloan played Van Helsing in the Bela Lugosi version of Dracula and was also featured in several of the other 1930s Universal horror classics. But for the Picture Slot, I chose a pulp magazine cover from the late artist Malcolm Smith, because this blog just doesn't have enough giant blond snake women.

Many happy returns to all the living on our list.


Prediction: “For a long time, there have been newspaper stories and covers of magazines that talked about ‘The end of antibiotics, question mark?’ Well, now I would say you can change the title to ‘The end of antibiotics, period.’”

Predictor: Arjun Srinivasan associate director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Reality: I'm not an expert on this so I don't have any way of talking about the reality here. Dr. Srinivasan says the spread of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSRA) from hospitals to school gyms and health clubs is a serious change in the already difficult to cure disease.

I have to say this puts a crimp in my weekend, because I had penciled in "bee colony collapse" as the gnawing fear in the back of my mind for the next few days. Now I have no idea what I will worry needlessly about, powerless to stop and uncertain about my knowledge base.

So... thanks a heap, Doc.

This month's splash page: I put up a new picture of the Terrafugia, the proposed flying car that is scheduled to be available in 2015. This is a computer version and doesn't look that much like the real prototype that has actually flown. This little object looks cool, but I have a hard time believing those tiny wings could provide enough lift for this cute little thing.

Looking one day ahead... INTO THE FUTURE!

We go back to 1893 again and hear from Bill Nye the American Humorist Guy, not the Science Guy who is still alive today.

Join us then... IN THE FUTURE!  

7 comments:

  1. because this blog just doesn't have enough giant blond snake women.

    Crossover!

    As I understand it, part of the problem with the lack of new antibiotics is that most of the drug manufacturers have decided not to work on developing new ones, since it's relatively hard given the resistant bugs evolving, and that the profit margin is much higher on boner pills.

    Oh dang, there's that cynic in me again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. oops. forgot the tags on that first line. Oh well, it's Friday.

      Delete
    2. I was talking to a fellow with a medical degree a few days ago about the amazing advances in medicine in the 20th Century. He was of the view that vaccines and improvements in hygiene accounted for the lion's share of the increasing life span and dropping death rate, but a lot of newer modern medicine is only a marginal improvement with a very high cost.

      I'm not arguing with him, though I would say our improved methods of dealing with heart disease also deserve to be on the Big Deal List.

      Delete
  2. Just to help your day a little more, I read a post last week in a science blog (now I can't find it, sorry) that said that many people who were treated by their MD's for Brown Recluse spider bites probably had a MRSA lesion since the number of bites and the geography of the victims doesn't correlate with spider populations.

    ReplyDelete
  3. OK, found it. Was in IO9, not a hard science blog. http://io9.com/search?q=MRSA+Brown+Recluse+spider

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for checking. I have been very fortunate in the quality of regular comments on this blog.

      Delete
  4. ...Bill Nye the American Humorist Guy, not the Science Guy who is still alive today.

    ARE YOU SURE? I've never trusted that dude.

    ReplyDelete

Traveler! Have you news... FROM THE FUTURE?