"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)

"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)
"John Scully's" comic strip that has a farewell every day (drawn and written by Ruben Bolling)
September 19 is the last post for this blog. Thanks to all my readers!

Thursday, September 12, 2013

12 September 2013

 Birthdays
Alfie Allen b. 1986 (Game of Thrones)
Emmy Rossum b. 1986 (The Day After Tomorrow)
Hans Zimmer b. 1957 (Batman Begins, Pirate of the Caribbean, Inception, Man of Steel)
Joe Pantoliano b. 1951 (The Matrix)
Ian Holm b. 1931 (Lord of the Rings, Alien)
Freddie Jones b. 1927 (Dune, Krull)
Stanislaw Lem b. 1921 died 27 March 2006 (Solaris, The Futurological Congress)
Edward Binns b.1916 died 4 December 1990 (Twilight Zone)

While Ms. Rossum is certainly cute enough to get the Picture Slot, she only has the one role in a genre movie, so instead I lead with a picture of the author Stanislaw Lem. It does all start with the writing.

Many happy returns of the day to the living.


Prediction: 12 September, 2000: Julian West and Edith Leete listen to the 5:00 pm concert in Boston, live artists conveyed by telephone.

Predictor: Looking Backward:2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy, published 1888

Reality:  Bellamy writes his story after the invention of the telephone but before the invention of radio. Musicians in various locations are playing twenty four hours a day. There is a German chocolate postcard that extrapolates on this idea, adding a projected movie as well.

It can’t be hard to create full employment , but I don’t envy the guys playing Souza at 3:00 a.m.

Looking one day ahead... INTO THE FUTURE!

Yet another exact date, this time from a TV show that first aired in 1975.

Join us then... IN THE FUTURE!

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for the picture; I have been a HUGE fan of Lem since stumbling across the Cyberiad in my local public library as a teen.

    He looks just like I figured.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In fact, I think back to college when I took a Literature and Science Fiction course, and the teacher made the claim (using the series Quark as evidence) that science fiction and comedy really didn't mesh. The Cyberiad was one of the examples I used to refute his assertion; he had never heard of him before. Got an A in the class.

      And this was before Douglas Adams.

      Delete
    2. I know some don't count Vonnegut as sci-fi, but I have never understood why not. He was hilarious.

      Delete

Traveler! Have you news... FROM THE FUTURE?